Centre of Excellence in Natural Resource Management

Honours students

Further Information

Study honours in Albany

CENRM has great opportunities for Honours students to undertake exciting projects.

2015 students and projects

  1. Matthew Long
  2. Jenny Middleton

You too can study honours in Albany - find out further information.

Matthew Long
Matthew Long

Habitat requirements and movement dynamics of freshwater cobbler in the Canning River

Construction of dams and weirs has regulated the flow and threatened the ecological values of the Canning River, an urban river in south-west Australia. My project aims to investigate the relationship between the flow rate and the habitat requirements and movement of freshwater cobbler (Tandanus bostocki) in the Canning River. As the largest freshwater fish in the region, cobbler have been used to assess the ecological health of rivers. Management decisions on Environmental Flow Allocations in the Canning River rely on knowledge of the impact of these flows on cobbler populations. I will investigate flow-ecology relationships with regard to cobbler populations using a combination of netting surveys and radio-telemetry during seasonally low and high flows during summer and winter respectively. Large and small-scale movements of fifteen cobbler carrying radio transmitters will be tracked in what is believed to be a first for freshwater fish in Western Australia. Little is known about the biology, habitat use, and movement dynamics of this reclusive species, and therefore my project has strong potential to assist management of the Canning River, and increase knowledge of an iconic Western Australian freshwater fish species.

Supervisors:
Dr Paul Close CENRM
Dr Leah Beesley CENRM

Jenny Middleton
Jenny Middleton

Urban waterway health: identifying key stressors in a flat sandy landscape.

Urbanisation depletes stream health by altering natural flow regimes, increasing nutrient concentrations, reducing water quality and modifying channel morphology. Although prior studies have identified that hydrologic alteration is typically the key driver of urban stream health, there is growing awareness that the natural climate and physiographic setting of a region can alter the key urban stressor(s). For example, hydrologic stress may be reduced in flat urban landscapes with permeable soils. In such landscapes, changes in other ecological factors, such as riparian shading and energy inputs, or water quality, may exert a greater influence on the health of urban streams. My research aims to assess the importance of hydrologic alteration and reduced riparian vegetation on the health of urban waterways across the Swan Coastal Plain (SCP), near Perth. This project will provide a better understanding of the key environmental factors that are linked to stream health on a flat, sandy landscape and will therefore assist the prioritisation of restoration activities that aim to maintain or increase the health of urban streams in the region.

Supervisors:
Dr Leah Beesley CENRM
Dr Paul Close CENRM
Dr Jane Prince CENRM

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Centre of Excellence in Natural Resource Management

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Last updated:
Tuesday, 22 September, 2015 4:16 PM

https://www.cenrm.uwa.edu.au/2318579